Kindergarten Home School Week 12: Wednesday

Home School Day 62 a

Following up on yesterday’s success, we started with a “fun” activity before diving into the more academic. As a result, we mostly had good spirits all day!

9-9.30: After a workbook page filling out some of our family’s favorite things, I pulled out old family photo albums. Travis – and little sister, too! – loved looking at baby pictures of themselves, spotting pictures of “young” mommy and daddy, and pointing out other relatives.

Home School Day 62 b

9.30-10: Travis did a quick workbook page on subtraction problems, and then we played Go Fish with a twist…Go Make Ten! Instead of asking for a pair (i.e. a 2 for a 2) you had to ask for a card that would make yours equal 10. So if he had a 2, he asked for an 8. This was tricky for Travis, the first time he was doing sums in his head instead of counting objects on a page.

Home School Day 62 d

10-10.30: Snack/recess. And dropping rocks on the patio!

10.30-11: ELA. Travis did a workbook page on letter R, and we searched for digraphs on the page (sh, ch, and th words). He did Lexia to round out the half hour. I asked him if he wanted to do some of the digraph worksheets his teacher had sent home. You can see the resounding no in his posture here.

Home School Day 62 c

11-11.30: Art. We made friendship bracelets! This was great not just for fine motor skills and creativity, but also thinking about others.

Home School Day 62 e

As he worked he decided which friend or relative each bracelet was for. Little sister was happy with the beads, too, and I was happy working alongside them both!

Home School Day 62 h

11.30-1.30: Lunch/free play.

1.30-2: Class Zoom. This was the toughest part of the day and we’ll leave it at that.

2-3: Cooking. We reset with a favorite activity, and today we cooked Moroccan food!

3: Outside. We played hopscotch with teen numbers, then drove around town to leave the friendship bracelets in friends’ mailboxes. A heart-warming good deed to end the day.

Home School Day 62 i

Crunchy Kefta Rolls

Crunchy Kefta Rolls alt

This was the first in a trio of recipes from Travis’s latest Raddish Kids, with a theme this month of Made in Morocco. It was Travis’s first time working with phyllo dough, not an easy ingredient! As always, I love the way that Raddish challenges my notion of what my budding chef can handle in the kitchen.

Crunchy Kefta Rolls (2)

Ingredients:

  • 8 sheets phyllo dough
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 8 ounces meatless crumbles (such as Lightlife)
  • 1/3 cup golden raisins
  • 1 tablespoon tomato paste
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 3/4 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground coriander
  • 1/4 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 4 tablespoons melted Earth Balance butter
  1. Ahead of time thaw the phyllo according to package directions. Be aware that this will probably requiring thawing overnight, or at least 8 hours.
  2. To prepare the filling, heat the olive oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add the meatless crumbles, breaking apart into pieces with the back of a spoon.
  3. Stir in the golden raisins, tomato paste, salt, cumin, cinnamon, coriander, and garlic powder. Continue to cook for 6 minutes, until heated through.
  4. Place 2 sheets of phyllo dough on a cutting board and use a pastry brush to brush with some of the butter. Use a pizza cutter to divide the sheets into 4 rectangles.
  5. Spoon a heaping tablespoon of filling onto one short edge of each rectangle. Roll up tightly and fold the edges under. Place on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper.
  6. Repeat three times with the remaining sheets of phyllo and filling, for 16 rolls total. We may have ended up short a few because my sous chef was taking lots of nibbles!
  7. Bake at 400 degrees F for 13 minutes, until lightly browned.

Crunchy Kefta Rolls (4)

We had so much fun exploring more about Moroccan culture during our taste test. I set up a blanket and pillows on the ground, and read the Moroccan manners section of the recipe card. Travis loved learning that in Morocco, it’s proper to eat on the floor and to use hands, not utensils.

Crunchy Kefta Rolls (5)

Finally, the recipe card features fun facts about Morocco, and additional tips about working with phyllo.

Crunchy Kefta Rolls (6)

As a bonus activity, he tested out writing in Arabic!

Arabic Writing (1)

Following along on the provided tracing sheet, Travis learned that he needed to move his pen from right to left, plus learned the Arabic words for common foods like apricot and tomato.

Arabic Writing (2)

Rock Drop

Rock Drop (4)

Now that warm weather is here, I’m looking for easy ways to entertain Veronika out on our patio. This activity was perfect, and couldn’t get any easier. You just need a container for water plus rocks, whether those found directly in your yard, or treasures from a recent nature walk.

We have an inflatable tray that’s perfect for water play, so I blew that up and filled it with water. (Alternatively, use a baby wading pool or even just a tray with high sides for this activity).

I filled the tray from our watering can, which caught Veronika’s attention immediately.

Rock Drop (1)

She came trotting over to the pile of rocks I’d set next to the tray, and before the water was even all poured she picked up the first one. She knew what to do! Ka-plink! The first rock went in.

Rock Drop (2)

Ka-plunk. Followed by the second.

Rock Drop (3)

And she worked her way straight through the whole pile.

Rock Drop (5)

So then we pulled them out and piled them up and did it again! This kept her busy for a full half hour. I wish I could expound upon it and say we did anything more thrilling than that, but this was pure toddler heaven.

Rock Drop (6)

Rocks plus water, folks, that’s it!

Rock Drop (7)

Shaken Ball Art

Shaken Ball Art (7)

Here’s a painting method that’s fun for toddlers because it involves lots of shaking and noise, fun for parents because the mess is contained, and fun for everyone because it produces a beautiful piece of art. It’s a great way for toddlers to send a card to a loved one…or also to involve toddlers in making art to thank essential workers and heroes.

For set up, Veronika and I poked through the craft bin to find items that would roll; bonus points if they would also make noise! We ended up with a Styrofoam ball, a pom pom, and small beads. I wish I had jingle bells, but we recently used them!

Shaken Ball Art (1)

I then cut out heart shapes from construction paper, choosing pink and red. You can use any color of shape of paper you like, but hearts felt appropriate for this project. Tape one heart into the bottom of a cookie tin (or similar container with a secure lid), and then add the round objects.

Shaken Ball Art (2)

Now we poured in blobs of paint. I let Veronika choose the colors, and she loved watching me squirt in a generous amount of each.

Shaken Ball Art (3)

Close the lid securely and shake! Veronika flinched at first, but then giggled at the loud sound. In retrospect, I wish I’d used my smallest cookie tin for this activity, since the large one was hard for her to hold securely and shake at the same time.

Shaken Ball Art (4)

At first she was frustrated, but then she liked watching me shake as I talked about all my movements: up, down, side to side etc.

Shaken Ball Art (6)

We opened up the tin for the big reveal: our heart was now covered in spatters and streaks of paint.

Shaken Ball Art (8)

Set aside to dry, and repeat with additional hearts. You may not need to add new paint after each round, depending how much is still left in the tin. As a result, we had some that were too painty, and some with perhaps not quite enough, but Veronika was proud of them all.