Spinach Tomato Scramble

Spinach Tomato Scramble a

Make this hearty tofu scramble for breakfast or dinner. Either way it’s a crowd-pleaser!

Ingredients:

  • 1 (1 pound) package firm tofu
  • 1/4 cup almond milk
  • 1/4 teaspoon curry powder
  • 1 teaspoon olive oil
  • 1/2 cup frozen spinach, thawed
  • 1/2 cup chopped tomato
  • 1/2 cup shredded Daiya mozzarella
  1. Combine the tofu, milk, and turmeric in a bowl and mash with a fork until the mixture looks like scrambled eggs.
  2. Heat the olive oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the tofu mixture and cook for about 3 to 5 minutes, until the liquid has mostly evaporated.
  3. Stir in the spinach, tomatoes, and cheese, and cook a final few minutes until heated through.

Spinach Tomato Scramble b

For variation, you can use 1/2 cup mild salsa in place of the fresh tomatoes. You can also substitute collard greens or kale for the spinach.

Spinach Scramble alt

Note: because of the watery salsa, I omitted the almond milk in this second version, and I think the kids liked it better!

Go to a Boat Show

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It’s been quite a while since we did a “field trip” with Veronika, but today we had the opportunity to take her to her first boat show!

Don’t shy away from crowded places like these with a toddler in tow. My best advice: bring a small stroller, not the bulkier kind that goes with a travel system. This allows for storage of diaper bags and lunch bags and coats without making it tough to navigate the crowds. Then hit the show! Just the vantage point from above was exciting.

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Once inside the show, there is so much about boats for little hands to love. Wheels to turn and buttons to press..

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…soft seats to scamper over, and hidden berths below decks to explore.

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Pontoon-style boats were a favorite; from a parent’s point of view, these are great because there are no tricky stairs or ladders to navigate.

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Boat shows often feature hands-on activities for kids, too. Veronika loved watching the older children splashing in kids-only paddle boats!

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Next she got to paint a wooden boat to take home.

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In sum, the event was a splash!

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Not Your Average Paper Clock

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It may be true that analog clocks are gong the way of cursive writing and the dodo bird, but I still hope to teach Travis the valuable skill of telling analog time. This paper plate clock is the best way I’ve found yet to visualize hours and minutes!

Most of the prep is grown-up work. If you have two different colored paper plates, simply use those, one atop the other. I solved the problem of having only white plates by coloring the rims with crayon, yellow for the hours and orange for the minutes.

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Hot glue the hour plate on top of the minute plate, making sure to glue only the center of the plates, not the rims.

Number the hours, and then cut the rims of the plate so each hour becomes a flap. You might want to make sure you’re numbering at more even intervals than I did in a hurry – whoops!

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Now lift back each hour flap and write the corresponding minute on the bottom plate. I cut out two hands in corresponding colors of cardstock, yellow for the hour and orange for the minute. Insert these into the center of the clock and attach with a brad.

It was time for a time telling lesson!

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Travis loved how intuitive this clock was! First we practiced skip counting by fives, just to familiarize him with how the minutes would read around the bottom rim.

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Then we had a few practice rounds. Once he latched on to how the yellow hand lined up with the yellow plate and orange with orange, he could answer almost any “pop quiz” I gave him.

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At various points throughout the day, I asked him to read our analog clock on the wall.

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“1, 10,” he said, but I reminded him: “Lift up the 10 and see what’s underneath!”

Aha! “1:50,” he said proudly. I can see how this will be an incredibly useful teaching tool.